Jamaica Land We Love – Jamaica National Anthem

The Jamaica National Anthem – “Jamaica Land We Love” can be enjoyed in the video below; it is presented as an instrumental piece.
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The words of our National Anthem is recognized as a prayer, and the lyrics are as follows:

Verse 1
Eternal Father bless our land,
Guard us with Thy mighty hand,
Keep us free from evil powers,
Be our light through countless hours.
To our leaders, Great Defender,
Grant true wisdom from above.
Justice, truth be ours forever,
Jamaica, land we love.
Jamaica, Jamaica, Jamaica land we love.

Verse 2
Teach us true respect for all,
Stir response to duty’s call,
Strengthen us the weak to cherish,
Give us vision Continue reading

Lignum Vitae – Jamaica National Flower

The national flower of Jamaica is the Lignum Vitae (Guaiacum officinale), which is indigenous to our island.

The Latin name Lignum Vitae which means “tree of life” or “wood of life” is very suitable, due to the fact that this flowering, evergreen tree has many medicinal uses.

As a herb, Lignum Vitae is known to prevent the building up of uric acid in joints, and is effective for treating gout, arthritis, blisters, epilepsy, and even mouth ulcers. It’s action is anesthetic. alterant, and anti-inflammatory.

The most used parts of the Lignum Vitae are the wood, bark, and resin; and they may be used as a tea and bath to relieve inflammation, and for gout attacks.

Please note: High dosages of Lignum Vitae may cause diarrhea as well as stomach and intestinal problems. The wood of this tree has also been reported to cause skin irritation. Stop using if symptoms such as: breathing problems, chest pain, chest congestion, skin hives, rashes, and inflammations occur.

The Wood Of The Lignum Vitae Tree

Lignum Vitae is regarded by most to be both the heaviest and hardest wood in the world. When placed in water, the wood will increase in density as it absorbs water; Continue reading

Moonshine Tonight

A Jamaican folk song describing what happened during the days when there was no electricity; when persons were happy for a moonlit night so that they could play and dance outdoors.

Verse 1
Moonshine tonight, come mek we dance and sing.
Moonshine tonight, come mek we dance and sing.

Chorus:
Mi deh rock so, yuh deh rock so,
Under banyan tree.
Mi deh rock so, yuh deh rock so,
Under banyan tree.
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Verse 2
Ladies may curtsy, and gentleman may bow.
Ladies may curtsy, and gentleman may bow.
[chorus]
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Verse 3
Come we join hands, mek we dance ’round and sing.
Come we join hands, mek we dance ’round and sing.
[chorus]
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Linstead Market

A Jamaican folk song about one Saturday night at Linstead Market.

Verse 1
Mi carry mi ackee go a Linstead Market,
Not a quattie* worth sell.
Mi Carry me ackee go a Linstead Market,
Not a quattie worth sell.

Chorus:
Lawd! What night, not a bite,
What a Saturday night!
Lawd! What a night not a bite,
What a Saturday night.

Verse 2
Everybody come feel up, feel up,
Not a quattie worth sell.
Everybody come feel up, feel up.
Not a quattie worth sell.
[chorus]
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Verse 3
Do mi mommy, nuh beat mi kill mi,
Sake a merry-go-round.
Do mi mommy, nuh beat me kill,
Sake a American rum.
[chorus]
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Verse 4
All di pickney dem a linga linga,
Fi whe dem mumma no bring.
All di pickney dem a linga linga,
Fi whe dem mumma no bring.

Lawd! What a night, not a bite,
What a Saturday night!
Lawd! What a night, not a bite.
How di pickney gwine feed?

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* Quattie:
Money equivalent to three half penny or 1½ pence, which was used in Jamaica between 1840 and 1969 when the Jamaican pound was the official currency.
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Sammy Dead

A Jamaican folk song describing the fate of a man called Sammy.

Verse 1
Sammy plant peas an’ corn down a gully; (mm-hm)
An it bear till it kill poor Sammy. (mm-hm)
Sammy dead, Sammy dead, Sammy dead-o. (mm-hm)
Sammy dead, Sammy dead, Sammy dead-o. (mm-hm)

Verse 2
A no tief Sammy tief mek dem kill him; (mm-hm)
A no lie Sammy tell mek him dead-o. (mm-hm)
But a grudgeful, yes dem grudgeful mek dem kill him. (mm-hm)
But a grudgeful, yes dem grudgeful mek dem kill him. (mm-hm)

Verse 3
Neighbour kyaan bear fi see neighbour flourish; (mm-hm)
Neighbour kyaan bear fi see neighbour flourish. (mm-hm)
Sammy dead, Sammy dead, Sammy dead-o. (mm-hm)
Sammy dead, Sammy dead, Sammy dead-o. (mm-hm)
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A Weh Yu Ben Deh?

A Jamaican folk song questioning the whereabouts of a young woman.

Verse 1
A whe yuh ben deh gal, mek me nuh get no tea?
A whe yuh ben deh gal, mek me nuh get no tea?
Me go a gully, me go a gully;
Me go a gully, mek yuh nuh get no tea.

Verse 2
A whe yuh go fa gal, mek me nuh get no tea?
A whe yuh go fa gal, mek me nuh get no tea?
Me go fi wata, me go fi wata;
Me go fi wata, mek yuh nuh get no tea.

Verse 3
Wha mek yuh tan long gal, wen yuh go a gully?
Wha mek yuh tan long gal, wen yuh go a gully?
Me cyan talk at all, me cyan talk at all;
For whe me go do, i’ sweeter dan de tea.
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Continue reading